XAO Data Center Public Tables

Result

Matched: 20

TablenameInfoTable desc.Res desc.
gallery.notfTable InfoImages from Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, UrumuqiImages from Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Urumuqi
glots.columnsTable InfoA table of columns within the tables listed in glots.tables. The global TAP schema collects information on tables and columns from known TAP servers. This facilitates locating queriable data by physics (via UCD) or keywords (via description).
glots.servicesTable InfoA table of TAP services harvested from the registry (and some spoon-fed). The global TAP schema collects information on tables and columns from known TAP servers. This facilitates locating queriable data by physics (via UCD) or keywords (via description).
glots.tablesTable InfoA table of tables accesible through the TAP services known to glots.services. The global TAP schema collects information on tables and columns from known TAP servers. This facilitates locating queriable data by physics (via UCD) or keywords (via description).
ivoa.emptyobscoreTable InfoAn empty table having all columns of the obscore table. Useful internally, and sometimes for tricky queries.Definition and support code for the ObsCore data model and table.
ivoa.ObsCoreTable InfoThe IVOA-defined obscore table, containing generic metadata for datasets within this datacenter.Definition and support code for the ObsCore data model and table.
notfits.notfTable InfoImages from Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, UrumuqiImages from Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Urumuqi
nsone.nsoneTable Info Images created by 1M-WideField Images created by 1M-WideField
obscode.dataTable Info List of Observatory Codes assigned by the Minor Planet Center (MPC). The codes are used in cataloguing astrometric observations of small bodies in the solar system. A code is unique for a certain location and consists of three digits or one letter and two digits. In this representation, we give the observatory code, the geocentric coordinates, and the observatory designation. List of Observatory Codes assigned by the Minor Planet Center (MPC). The codes are used in cataloguing astrometric observations of small bodies in the solar system. A code is unique for a certain location and consists of three digits or one letter and two digits. In this representation, we give the observatory code, the geocentric coordinates, and the observatory designation.
ppmxl.mainTable Info PPMXL is a catalog of positions, proper motions, 2MASS- and optical photometry of 900 million stars and galaxies, aiming to be complete down to about V=20 full-sky. It is the result of a re-reduction of USNO-B1 together with 2MASS to the ICRS as represented by PPMX. PPMXL is a catalog of positions, proper motions, 2MASS- and optical photometry of 900 million stars and galaxies, aiming to be complete down to about V=20 full-sky. It is the result of a re-reduction of USNO-B1 together with 2MASS to the ICRS as represented by PPMX.
pul.pulsarTable InfoThe pulsar timing data were obtained with the Nanshan 25M radio telescope. Our observations, which commenced in January 2000, have been made using a dual-channel room-temperature receiver with a bandwidth of 320 MHz centered at 1540 MHz before June 2002. The de-dispersion was provided by a 2X128X2.5 MHz analog filter-bank. The format of the AFB data is "Timer". A cryogenic receiver was mounted in July 2002, which increases the sensitivity to 0.5 mJy. In January 2010, a digital filter-bank (DFB) system came into operation. The higher time resolution allows us to monitor about 280 pulsars, including ten millisecond-pulsars (MSP). The format of the DFB data is "Psrfit". The "psrchive" program could reads and analyzes the data.The data could only be used with the permission of Dr. Na Wang (na.wang@xao.ac.cn), please send her an email for your request.The pulsar timing data were obtained with the Nanshan 25M radio telescope. Our observations, which commenced in January 2000, have been made using a dual-channel room-temperature receiver with a bandwidth of 320 MHz centered at 1540 MHz before June 2002. The de-dispersion was provided by a 2X128X2.5 MHz analog filter-bank. The format of the AFB data is "Timer". A cryogenic receiver was mounted in July 2002, which increases the sensitivity to 0.5 mJy. In January 2010, a digital filter-bank (DFB) system came into operation. The higher time resolution allows us to monitor about 280 pulsars, including ten millisecond-pulsars (MSP). The format of the DFB data is "Psrfit". The "psrchive" program could reads and analyzes the data.The data could only be used with the permission of Dr. Na Wang (na.wang@xao.ac.cn), please send her an email for your request.
pulsarcatalog.dataTable Info The Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalog is a catalog of known pulsars compiled by R.N. Manchester et al. and is descended from pulsar database used for the paper "Catalog of 558 Pulsars" by J.H. Taylor, R.N. Manchester and A.G. Lyne 1993, ApJS, 88, 529-568. The current catalog has been supplemented by inclusion of published data from more recent radio surveys, in particular, the Parkes Multibeam (PM) Pulsar Survey (Manchester et al. 2001, MNRAS, 328, 17-35) [available at the HEASARC as the PMPULSAR table] and the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey (Edwards et al. 2001, MNRAS, 326, 358-374), both made using the ATNF Parkes 64-m radio telescope. Binary parameters for known binary pulsars are also included as well as all available astrometric and spin parameter information for all pulsars. The catalog includes all published rotation-powered pulsars. Two separate small subsets of pulsars detected ONLY at high energies are also included in the current table: the first group comprises X-ray and gamma-ray pulsars which are apparently powered by spin-down energy, but which have not been detected at radio wavelengths, while the second group contains anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft-gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) for which coherent pulsations have been detected. Accretion-powered pulsars such as Her X-1 and the recently discovered X-Ray millisecond pulsars such as SAX J1808.4-3658 are not included in this table, however. Many people have contributed to the compilation of the data contained in this catalog and the database that it was derived from. The authors particularly thank Andrew Lyne of the University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Observatory, David Nice of Princeton University, and Russell Edwards, then at Swinburne University of Technology. The also acknowledge the efforts of Warwick University students Adam Goode and Steven Thomas who compiled and checked a recent version of the database. The original (summer 2003) database at the ATNF website was compiled with the invaluable assistance of Maryam Hobbs, while the ATNF web interface was designed and constructed by Albert Teoh, a Summer Vacation Scholar at the ATNF in 2002/2003. The authors would appreciate if anyone making use of this catalog in a publication acknowledges the source of their information by quoting the ATNF Pulsar Catalog website address of http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/psrcat/ The Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalog is a catalog of known pulsars compiled by R.N. Manchester et al. and is descended from pulsar database used for the paper "Catalog of 558 Pulsars" by J.H. Taylor, R.N. Manchester and A.G. Lyne 1993, ApJS, 88, 529-568. The current catalog has been supplemented by inclusion of published data from more recent radio surveys, in particular, the Parkes Multibeam (PM) Pulsar Survey (Manchester et al. 2001, MNRAS, 328, 17-35) [available at the HEASARC as the PMPULSAR table] and the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey (Edwards et al. 2001, MNRAS, 326, 358-374), both made using the ATNF Parkes 64-m radio telescope. Binary parameters for known binary pulsars are also included as well as all available astrometric and spin parameter information for all pulsars. The catalog includes all published rotation-powered pulsars. Two separate small subsets of pulsars detected ONLY at high energies are also included in the current table: the first group comprises X-ray and gamma-ray pulsars which are apparently powered by spin-down energy, but which have not been detected at radio wavelengths, while the second group contains anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft-gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) for which coherent pulsations have been detected. Accretion-powered pulsars such as Her X-1 and the recently discovered X-Ray millisecond pulsars such as SAX J1808.4-3658 are not included in this table, however. Many people have contributed to the compilation of the data contained in this catalog and the database that it was derived from. The authors particularly thank Andrew Lyne of the University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Observatory, David Nice of Princeton University, and Russell Edwards, then at Swinburne University of Technology. The also acknowledge the efforts of Warwick University students Adam Goode and Steven Thomas who compiled and checked a recent version of the database. The original (summer 2003) database at the ATNF website was compiled with the invaluable assistance of Maryam Hobbs, while the ATNF web interface was designed and constructed by Albert Teoh, a Summer Vacation Scholar at the ATNF in 2002/2003. The authors would appreciate if anyone making use of this catalog in a publication acknowledges the source of their information by quoting the ATNF Pulsar Catalog website address of http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/psrcat/
spm4.mainTable Info The SPM4 Catalog contains absolute proper motions, celestial coordinates, and B,V photometry for 103,319,647 stars and galaxies between the south celestial pole and -20 degrees declination. The catalog is roughly complete to V=17.5. It is based on photographic and CCD observations taken with the Yale Southern Observatory's double-astrograph at Cesco Observatory in El Leoncito, Argentina. The SPM4 Catalog contains absolute proper motions, celestial coordinates, and B,V photometry for 103,319,647 stars and galaxies between the south celestial pole and -20 degrees declination. The catalog is roughly complete to V=17.5. It is based on photographic and CCD observations taken with the Yale Southern Observatory's double-astrograph at Cesco Observatory in El Leoncito, Argentina.
tap_schema.columnsTable InfoColumns in tables available for ADQL querying. XAO Data Center's Table Access Protocol (TAP) service with table metadata.
tap_schema.groupsTable InfoColumns that are part of groups within tables available for ADQL querying. XAO Data Center's Table Access Protocol (TAP) service with table metadata.
tap_schema.key_columnsTable InfoColumns participating in foreign key relationships between tables available for ADQL querying. XAO Data Center's Table Access Protocol (TAP) service with table metadata.
tap_schema.keysTable InfoForeign key relationships between tables available for ADQL querying. XAO Data Center's Table Access Protocol (TAP) service with table metadata.
tap_schema.schemasTable InfoSchmemas containing tables available for ADQL querying. XAO Data Center's Table Access Protocol (TAP) service with table metadata.
tap_schema.tablesTable InfoTables available for ADQL querying. XAO Data Center's Table Access Protocol (TAP) service with table metadata.
ucd.dataTable Info The Unified Content Descriptor (UCD) is a formal vocabulary astronomical data that is controlled by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The vocabulary is restricted in order to avoid proliferation of terms and synonyms, and controlled in order to avoid ambiguities as far as possible. It is intended to be flexible, so that it is understandable to both humans and computers. UCDs describe astronomical quantities, and they are built by combining words from the controlled vocabulary. The Unified Content Descriptor (UCD) is a formal vocabulary astronomical data that is controlled by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The vocabulary is restricted in order to avoid proliferation of terms and synonyms, and controlled in order to avoid ambiguities as far as possible. It is intended to be flexible, so that it is understandable to both humans and computers. UCDs describe astronomical quantities, and they are built by combining words from the controlled vocabulary.

Query Form

An overview over the tables available for ADQL querying within the XAO Data Center